Staying Active amid the Coronavirus Pandemic Can Help Manage Depression and Anxiety, Study Says

Although many people around the world are struggling with their mental health amid the coronavirus pandemic, staying active may help make stress and depression easier to manage.

A new study published earlier this month, which has yet to be peer-reviewed, monitored how changes in physical activity and screen time affected the mental health of over 3,000 adults in the United States during the early days of the global health crisis.

The volunteer participants, who were recruited via email and social media postings in early April, agreed to answer questions about their daily activity levels before and during the pandemic, as well as how many hours they spent in front of screens. The participants, who ranged in age from 18 to the mid-80s, were also asked about the current states of their mental health and their levels of isolation.

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10 znakova da patite od anksioznosti: Upozoravajući signali koje ne smete ignorisati!

Anksioznost je najčešći mentalni poremećaj koji ukoliko se ne dijagnostifikuje i ne leči na vreme može da ostavi psihičke probleme.

Kevin Gilliland, klinički psiholog otkrio je za HuffPost da kad pita pacijente misle li da su anksiozni, odgovor je najčešće ne iako se ustvari bore sa tim.

Anksioznost je teško prepoznati jer se pojavljuje na mnogo različitih načina koji mogu da izgledaju nepovezano.

Naši životi su tokom pandemije korona virusa iznenada promenjeni, te osećamo dodatnu brigu, strah i stres. Upravo to može da aktivira hormon stresa kortizol , a time i dovede do emocionalnih i fizičkih simptoma.

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A Third of Americans Show Signs of Clinical Anxiety or Depression in the Wake of the Coronavirus

In the wake of the ongoing coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, a third of Americans are showing signs of clinical anxiety and depression, according to new data collected by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) in partnership with the Census Bureau.

The data collection, which began on April 23 — and will continue for 90 days — was collected in the form of a 20-minute online survey called the Household Pulse Survey. The experiment was done to provide relevant information about the impact of the global health crisis on the U.S.

Participants were asked how often they have felt bothered or showed little interest or pleasure in doing things. According to the findings, between April 23 and May 19, roughly 30 percent of Americans experienced symptoms of an anxiety disorder and nearly 24 percent experienced symptoms of a depressive disorder as a result of the coronavirus outbreak.

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Na ovih 10 znakova pripazite jer oni ukazuju na tjeskobu

Zanima vas ova tema? Onda pročitajte i ovaj članak: Navečer ne možete zaspati jer se puno brinete? Probajte ovo

Kevin Gilliland, klinički psiholog rekao je za HuffPost da kad pita pacijente misle li da su anksiozni, odgovor je najčešće ne.

U stvari se oni stvarno bore s problemom mentalnog zdravlja, rekao je. Anksioznost je teško odrediti ili prepoznati jer se pojavljuje na mnogo različitih načina koji mogu izgledati nepovezano.

To je osobito istinito sada jer mnogi osjećaju anksioznost zbog pandemije koronavirusa. Naši su životi izmijenjeni na nezamislive i brojne načine, što može pokrenuti hormon stresa kortizol i dovesti do emocionalnih i fizičkih simptoma.

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Airbnb trials virtual date experiences with Bumble

According to one survey, nearly half of Americans have reported feelings that their mental health has been negatively disrupted by the coronavirus crisis. One national public health group Well Being Trust has even made the harrowing prediction that 75,000 Americans could die from drug / alcohol abuse or suicide because of the pandemic if solutions are not found.

Psychologist Doctor Kevin Gilliland told Travel Daily News: “You’re having feelings of isolation and loneliness like you’ve never had before.”

Fairytrail says on its website: “Since travelling is impossible now, this is how we can take some travel magic and bring it into our lives: These virtual adventures allow us to learn new things, meet people from different cultures, and experience something live and fun with people we like.”

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Experts Weigh in on Grieving in the Time of Coronavirus

Grief doesn’t look the way it did a few months ago.

I was in the middle of a Zoom call with some friends when I got overwhelmed talking about a friend who passed away amid the coronavirus pandemic, and started to cry. I was immediately, to put it lightly, so uncomfortable. Crying in a room by yourself and being watched through a screen by people is … interesting, to say the least — even if some of those people are your closest friends. I put my hand over the camera so they didn’t have to see me ugly cry à la Kim Kardashian.

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10 Sneaky Ways Your Coronavirus Anxiety Is Coming Out

Anxiety is pretty damn sneaky.

Kevin Gilliland, a clinical psychologist and executive director at i360 in Dallas, said that when he asks patients if they think they have anxiety, the answer is most often “no.”

In reality, they really do struggle with the mental health problem, he said. Anxiety can be hard to pinpoint or identify because presents in many different ways that may seem unrelated.

This is especially true right now when it comes to the anxiety many of us are feeling due to the coronavirus pandemic. Our lives have been altered in unimaginable and numerous ways, which can trigger the stress hormone cortisol and lead to emotional and physical symptoms.

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Fairytrail app to offer travel-centric virtual dates with Viator and Airbnb

With travel restrictions and shelter-in-place, nearly half of Americans report that the coronavirus crisis is affecting their mental health. And an alarming projection from the national public health group Well Being Trust estimates that 75,000 Americans could die from drug or alcohol misuse and suicide related to COVID-19. “You’re having feelings of isolation and loneliness like you’ve never had before,” says psychologist Dr. Kevin Gilliland.

Both the team at Fairytrail and its users have been feeling the pain too. “All I do is watch movies and video chat. I want to change it up because I feel like I’m going crazy,” one employee reports.

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Dr. Kevin Gilliland, PsyD – Managing Mental Health at all Stages of Success

Our world has changed a lot in the past few weeks. These changes have been unimaginable, and with those, there is a new emphasis on mental health. If you’re looking for ways to manage and alleviate the anxiety and overwhelm that we all experience, then today’s show is for you.

Dr. Kevin Gilliland, Psy. D. is an expert in mental health, depression, and addiction. He’s the author of Struggle Well, Live Well: 60 Ways to Navigate Life’s Good, Bad, and In-Between. After working for more than two decades in healthcare as a clinical psychologist, Kevin became a pioneer of outpatient treatment as the CEO and Executive Director of Innovation 360, a treatment center for alcohol and drug addiction, depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, family therapy, and life development. 

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Coronavirus Has Been Devastating to Americans’ Mental Health — Here’s What to Do

With the death toll increasing each day and hundreds of thousands of people in the hospital, the physical health effects of the new coronavirus, COVID-19, are clear. But what may not be as obvious is how much the virus is harming people’s mental health.

So far, COVID-19 has significantly increased the mental health struggles of Americans. Nearly half of people who are sheltering in place said that the pandemic has increased their stress or worry, according to a new poll from the Kaiser Family Foundation. The majority of texters to the Crisis Text Line — 84 percent — say they are experiencing stress related to COVID-19, as of April 20. And an alarming projection from the national public health group Well Being Trust estimates that 75,000 Americans could die from drug or alcohol misuse and suicide related to COVID-19.

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