How frontline workers can take care of their mental health, avoid burnout

TEMPLE, Texas — Medical professionals have been on the front lines to fight COVID-19 for almost a year. According to multiple studies, it has taken a toll on people’s mental health. In this week’s “Your Best Life,” 6 News Anchor Leslie Draffin spoke with a Dallas-based clinical psychologist about how to combat burnout and stress, especially if you’re a frontline worker.

According to a mental health survey of healthcare workers who help fight COVID-19 right now, 93% are stressed, 86% are experiencing anxiety, 77% report frustration, 76% are exhausted and burned out and 75% are overwhelmed.

“We’re not usually part of the story,” said Dr. Kevin Gilliland, a Dallas-based clinical psychologist. “There are times in our life that we’re going through something similar to our patients. But now, everybody that comes in, we’re all part of the same stories. We’re all wrestling with some of the same issues and so that really starts to take a toll on us because those are the conversations that we have every day at work, and then we go home and have the same conversation so it’s like we don’t get away from it.”

Dr. Gilliland has helped clients battle burnout during the pandemic. He said, “It’s always physical and it’s always psychological. It doesn’t matter what you do for a living. The symptoms look the same.”

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Mental Health Checklist

Quarantine can be tough on your mental and physical health. Dr. Kevin Gilliland joined us with a mental health checklist you can run through to keep yourself healthy and happy during these times.

Watch the video here.

The ‘Coronasomnia’ Effect Leading to Increase in Sleep Disorders

Dr. Kevin Gilliland, clinical psychologist and Executive Director at Innovation360, joined Wake Up With Cheddar to break down the spike in insomnia occurring all over the world due to uncertainty from the COVID-19 pandemic. Dr. Gilliland discusses the mental and physical consequences of a lack of sleep, and gives tips for how we can put ourselves in the best position to get a good night’s rest.

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3 tools to remain mentally, physically healthy | Your Best Life

DALLAS — In this week’s “Your Best Life,” 6 News Anchor Leslie Draffin spoke with a Dallas-based clinical psychologist about the three tools we all can use to remain physically and mentally healthy.

Dr. Kevin Gilliland is a Dallas-based clinical psychologist with over 20-years-experience managing mental health.

“This is not an event for us to get through. This is a change in life that we have to adjust to. We have to be creative and we have to be willing to do some things that are outside our normal routine.” Gilliland said.

He said there are three keys to remaining healthy right now.

“Sleep is power, food is fuel and movement is medicine.”

The Anxiety and Depression Association of America said roughly 40 million Americans over age 18 suffer from anxiety. According to Dr. Gilliland, the first thing that might help is better sleep.

 

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